Teaching Expected Behavior

Once expectations have been defined, systematic teaching of those expected behaviors must be a routine part of the school day. Effective instruction of social behavioral skills requires more than simply providing the rule–it requires instruction, practice, feedback, reteaching, and encouragement1,2.

Learner Objectives:

Develop a system to teach expected behavior in the social behavioral curriculum, that includes:

  • understand why teaching social behavioral skills is important;
  • engaging all staff in a process of writing lesson plans;
  • creating a set of lesson plans to initially teach acquisition of expected behaviors;
  • creating a set of booster lessons for maintenance of expected behaviors; and
  • developing and sharing a schedule for teaching expected behaviors.

Essential Functions:

  • The building leadership team has engaged all staff in a process of writing lesson plans to teach expected behavior in the social behavioral curriculum.
  • The building leadership team has developed a set of lesson plans to initially teach acquisition of expected behavior in the social behavioral curriculum.
  • The building leadership team has developed a set of booster lessons for maintenance of expected behavior in the social behavioral curriculum.
  • The building leadership team has a schedule for teaching expectations in the social behavioral curriculum.

Participant and Presenter Materials

Recommended Prerequisites

Participant Materials

Participant Handouts

Handouts

Pre/Post Assessment

 Pre/Post Assessment


Presenter Materials

Presenter PowerPoints with Notes: A PowerPoint file with detailed presenter notes is available for the module.

 Facilitator Materials

Implementation Supports

Practice Profile

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Additional Resources
  1. Algozzine, B., Wang, C., & Violette, A. S. (2011). Reexamining the relationship between academic achievement and social behavior. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 13(1), 3-16.
  2. Cotton, K. (1995) Effective schools research summary: 1995 update. Portland, OR: Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory.